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Frequently Asked Questions

Online Portal Questions

General Questions

I had a login to my old portal. What happened to it?
As of March 1, 2017, Provident Trust Group has been phasing out the old portal and replacing it with a new one, designed to give you better access to the information you need and to provide you with new functionality, such as the ability to initiate fund transfers and investments. You can register for the new portal here. If you prefer to access your account via the old portal, you can do it here.  You can continue to access this portal by clicking on the ‘Advisor Login’ link on the trustprovident.com homepage.
How do I change my password in the Online Portal?
Once you are logged in to the portal, you can change your password by clicking on your name in the upper right hand corner and selecting ‘My Profile’. In the menu on the left side of the page, you will see a link for ‘Change Password’.
How can I reset my password in my Online Portal?
To reset your password, click the ‘Forgot Password’ link and a new password will be sent to the email that you used to register for the portal. Please note that Provident Trust Group’s VIP Services Team cannot reset your password.
Do all internet browsers support Provident Trust Group’s secure portal?
Currently, Google Chrome is the preferred browser for our client portal although other browsers may work.

Self-Directed IRA Questions

General Account Questions

How do I update my contact information?

Visit our Forms page at www.trustprovident.com/forms/ and locate “Change Forms.”  Click on the Change/Update Contact Information Form. Once completed, sign and submit to Provident Trust Group by:

  • Email to info@trustprovident.com
  • Fax to (702) 253-7565
  • Mail to 8880 W Sunset Rd #250, Las Vegas, NV 89148
How do I initiate a cash transfer in to Provident Trust Group using the paper Incoming Transfer Form?
To initiate a transfer of cash into your account at Provident Trust Group, please complete the Incoming Transfer Form and select either Option A) Complete Transfer or Option B) Partial Transfer and select Cash.  Please enter the amount of cash you would like to transfer in the line beside the Cash option. If selecting a “Complete Transfer”, please note that Provident Trust Group cannot hold publicly traded stock, bonds, or mutual funds. This means that all assets must be liquidated prior to submitting the request. Incoming Transfer Forms must be sent to Provident Trust Group so that we can execute the document and include a Letter of Acceptance with our submission to your current custodian. Sending this form directly to them without our signature or letter of acceptance will result in the rejection of your transfer request. This form can be sent to Provident Trust Group via fax or email (if the resigning custodian accepts faxed transfer requests) or mail (required if the resigning custodian requires original transfer requests).
How do I initiate a cash transfer in to Provident Trust Group using the electronic Incoming Transfer Form?
To initiate a transfer of cash into your account at Provident Trust Group, log in to the Provident Trust Group Online Portal and click ‘Transfer-In Funds’.  From there, the ‘Create New’ button in upper right on the screen will walk you through entering the information needed to complete the Incoming Transfer Form. Once your resigning custodian’s information is entered, select either Option A) Complete Transfer or Option B) Partial Transfer. Please enter the amount of cash you would like to transfer in the line beside the Cash option. If selecting a “Complete Transfer”, please note that Provident Trust Group cannot hold publicly traded stocks, bonds, or mutual funds. This means that all assets must be liquidated prior to submitting the request. If your resigning custodian accepts transfer requests via fax, you can complete the form using the digital signature option and submit to Provident Trust Group. We will review your form and fax it to your current custodian with our Letter of Acceptance. If your resigning custodian requires original signatures on documents, you will need to print the form, sign it and mail it to our offices for processing.
How do I initiate a transfer of an asset in to Provident Trust Group using the paper Incoming Transfer Form?
To initiate a transfer of assets into your account at Provident Trust Group, please complete the Incoming Transfer Form and select either Option A) Complete Transfer or Option B) Partial Transfer and select Asset.  In the box beside the Asset line, put a description of the asset you are transferring. Requests to transfer an asset to Provident Trust Group must come with a recent statement from your current custodian. Please review the Incoming Asset One Sheet for additional information about the documents required to transfer assets to your account at Provident Trust Group. Incoming Transfer Forms must be sent to Provident Trust Group so that we can execute the document and include a Letter of Acceptance with our submission to your current custodian. Sending this form directly to them without our signature or Letter of Acceptance will result in the rejection of your transfer request. This form can be sent to Provident Trust Group via fax or email (if the resigning custodian accepts faxed transfer requests) or mail (required if the resigning custodian requires original transfer requests).
How do I initiate a transfer of an asset in to Provident Trust Group using the electronic Incoming Transfer Form?
To initiate a transfer of an asset into your account at Provident Trust Group, log in to The Provident Trust Group Online Portal and click ‘Transfer-In Funds’. From there, the ‘Create New’ button in upper right on the screen will walk you through entering the information needed to complete the Incoming Transfer Form. Once your resigning custodian’s information is entered, select either Option A) Complete Transfer or Option B) Partial Transfer. Please put a description of the asset you are transferring in the asset description box. You will be required to upload a recent statement from your current custodian. If your resigning custodian accepts transfer requests via fax, you can complete the form using the digital signature option and submit to Provident Trust Group. We will review your form and fax it to your current custodian with our Letter of Acceptance. If your resigning custodian requires original signatures on documents, you will need to print the form, sign it and mail it to our offices for processing.
What is a transfer?
A transfer is a movement of funds between two like accounts (i.e., Traditional IRA to Traditional IRA, Roth IRA to Roth IRA, etc.) from one financial institution to another.
How is a transfer different from a rollover?
A rollover can be a movement between like accounts (i.e. Traditional IRA to Traditional IRA) or movement between different accounts (i.e. 401(k) to Traditional IRA) from one financial institution to another. Please note that as of 2015, the IRS has issued limitations on the number of Rollovers that can be done between like accounts. Rollovers between like accounts can only be done once per rolling year. This means that if you roll funds over on August 20, 2017, you will not be able to complete another like to like rollover until August 21, 2018. Please see IRA One Rollover Per Year Rule for additional information regarding this change.
What is the difference between an indirect rollover and a direct rollover?
A direct rollover is when one financial institution sends funds directly to another. An indirect rollover is when one financial institution distributes funds to an individual and the individual must send the funds to their new financial institution. When doing an indirect rollover, it is important to be aware of a couple of key points.

  1. The amount sent to the new financial institution must be the same amount distributed from the old financial institution. This means that if funds were withheld for taxes, the amount withheld must be made up for by the client.
  2. Funds must be sent to the new financial institution within 60 days of constructive receipt of the funds from the old financial institution.
Do you require a medallion signature guarantee on transfer out requests?
Provident Trust Group only requires a medallion signature guarantee on transfer-out requests that are faxed to us. If the originals are sent by mail, we do not require a medallion signature guarantee.
Where can I locate account management forms on the Provident Trust Group website?
All forms needed by Provident Trust Group to take action on your account are located at:  https://trustprovident.com/forms/.  If you need assistance selecting a form or completing it, please contact our VIP Services Team or see the FAQ section on ‘What do I need to know to complete …’ and select the form you are looking to complete.
Where can I locate tax documents from previous years filed by Provident Trust Group?
Tax forms filed with the IRS and annual statements back to 2014 can be accessed via our Online Portal.  Starting in May of 2017 with the Form 5498, forms were uploaded annually as soon as they were mailed.  If you need a copy of an annual statement or tax form filed with the IRS prior to 2014, please contact our VIP Services Team.
What are the benefits of a Roth IRA?
Although a Roth IRA does not provide a deduction for contributions, it does provide some benefits that Traditional IRAs (pre-tax) do not.

  • All earnings are tax-free when you or your beneficiary withdraw them (based on eligibility) for income
  • There is no distribution penalty on certain withdrawals
  • There is no annual Required Minimum Distribution after age 70½

Some important questions to consider before opening a Roth IRA are:

  • How long will it be before you need to take a distribution from your IRA?
  • What will your tax bracket be when you take a distribution?
  • What type of earnings will you receive on your IRA until that time?

By contributing more, earlier, your Roth IRA will add greater tax leverage to your retirement savings, since it holds after-tax dollars. And since it’s a Roth IRA, you’re not subject to take minimum distributions when you reach 70½ which will allow your earnings to grow tax-free, longer.

What’s special about the Solo 401(k)?
There are several unique advantages offered by the Solo 401(k). They include:

  • Significant tax-deductible contributions. Depending on your income, the Solo 401(k) may allow twice as much (or more) tax-deductible contributions, when compared to other self-employed retirement plans.
  • The most generous “catch up” contributions for those 50 or older. An extra $5000 per year can be contributed for a Solo 401(k) vs $0-$2500 for other retirement plan types.
  • Flexible funding requirements. Once established, no contribution is required in any year if it is not financially feasible. There is a maximum annual Solo 401(k) contribution, but no minimum required contribution. The contribution flexibility of a Solo 401(k) eliminates potential funding worries if there is a less-profitable year of business.
  • Personal loans are permitted. 50% of the assets of the Solo 401(k) (or up to $50,000) may be borrowed using a Solo 401(k) loan. Money is available when needed tax-free and penalty-free, so the Solo 401(k) enables immediate tax savings and builds a source of funds that can be tapped in an emergency. This loan still requires a schedule payback over a period of 5 years or less.
  • Simplicity – both to set up and maintain. Administration is minimal because complex discrimination tests are not required as with corporate 401(k) plans. IRS Form 5500 does not need to be filed unless the plan’s assets exceed $250,000 in value, although many CPAs and advisors suggest filing the 5500 annually in the first year that the plan is established.

Fees

How can I pay my annual fee?
Your annual fee can be paid in four ways:

  1. Pay online: Visit https://trustprovident.com/make-a-payment/. You will need to enter the account holder’s account number and the invoice number from the invoice you received.
  2. Pay by check: Mail check and the bottom portion of your invoice to: Provident Trust Group, LLC ATTN:  Lockbox Department P.O. Box 3640 Ontario, CA 91761-0964
  3. Pay by phone: Call (888) 855-9856 and provide your credit card information over the phone.
  4. Pay from cash in account: You can call in to request that the invoice be paid from the cash in your account or send in your invoice with the box marked to pay from the cash in your account. Funds will sweep from your account automatically 45 days after the date on the invoice if the invoice has not been paid in another fashion.
Why do you charge fees?
Provident Trust Group assesses a fee to custody and administer the account for the account holder. We do not receive a fee on your investment or your investment’s performance. Administration duties include the accounting for your investment, required IRS and state filings, facilitation of your investment, distribution requests, access to our Online Portal, and compliance. Provident Trust Group charges a flat-rate annual fee to maintain your account, rather than a fee that increases based on the number of assets or the value of the assets held in your account.
When are fees due?
Your Custodial and Document Fee are due at the time of account establishment and then annually thereafter on the anniversary of the establishment of your account. Transactional fees are due at the time of the transaction.
How does your fee structure differ from other custodians who custody traditional and alternative assets?

Provident Trust Group offers a flat-rate annual fee. This differs from many other alternative asset custodians who may increase your annual fee based on an increase in the number of assets you select, value of your assets, or even the purchase of a different asset class. Most custodians of traditional assets collect fees and/or commissions based off of the amount of trades or recommendations of investment choices.  For our full fee schedule, click here.

Prohibited Transactions

What is a prohibited transaction?

When using retirement funds to make an investment it is important for the account owner to understand the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) rules and regulations to avoid engaging in a prohibited transaction with a disqualified person. A prohibited transaction is any improper use of the retirement account by the account owner, beneficiary or any disqualified person.

What is a disqualified person?

Generally a “disqualified person” includes, but is not limited to:

  • Yourself
  • Your lineal ascendants and descendants
  • The spouse of a lineal descendant
  • Your spouse
  • Any entity that is owned 50% or more by disqualified persons
  • An entity that is controlled 50% or more by disqualified persons
Can my qualified account invest in an entity that I or another disqualified person owns?

No, your qualified account may not invest in an entity owned by a disqualified person as that could result in a prohibited transaction.

What are the consequences of a prohibited transaction?

A prohibited transaction could lead to a complete distribution of the account with taxes and penalties incurred.

Assets / Investment Questions

General Asset Questions

What happens if the private stock I own becomes public?

If your qualified account at Provident Trust Group holds private stock that is going public you need to find a custodian that can hold publicly traded stock and transfer the stock to an account there.

Can my qualified account invest in an LLC or LP that I or a disqualified person owns?

If your qualified account invests in an LLC or LP that you or a disqualified person owns or controls, the investment could be a prohibited transaction.

Does the security document (i.e. deed or mortgage note) need to be recorded?

Typically it is in the best interest of the lender for the documentation to be officially recorded. However, it will depend on where the collateral is located.

Does a Mortgage note need to be for 100% of the property?

No, different percentages can be permitted so long as the note is for more than the amount being borrowed.

Can someone gift me a Mortgage note?

According to the IRS, a Mortgage note must be made for value and cannot be a gift or for free.

What supporting documents do I need to purchase an investment in my Provident Trust Group account?
The supporting documents needed to purchase an investment vary based on the investment being purchased. Documents needed for each investment type can be found on Section 3 of our Direction of Investment form.
In what types of accounts can I put alternative assets?
Alternative assets can be held in a variety of qualified accounts including Traditional IRAs, Roth IRAs, SIMPLE IRAs, SEP IRAs, HSAs, ESAs, and 401(k)s including Solo 401(k)s.
Can I purchase real estate that I or my corporation already owns with my account at Provident Trust Group?
No. This is potentially considered a prohibited transaction, per Internal Revenue Code 4975. You may not purchase a property or an interest in a property that is currently owned by any disqualified party. Per IRS Publication 590: disqualified parties include your fiduciary and members of your family (spouse, ancestor, lineal descendant, and any spouse of a lineal descendant), and more.
Can I invest funds in real estate from my account with Provident Trust Group using an LLC?
Yes, you may use a special purpose LLC to purchase and hold title to invest in real estate. This involves the forming of an LLC with the self-directed retirement account as an owner and/or member of the LLC. It is important to structure the ownership of your LLC to ensure that your investments do not constitute a prohibited transaction. Always consult a qualified tax attorney or CPA to properly structure your LLC to ensure it outlines the additional precautions to consider when investing with a qualified account.
Can I obtain a mortgage to invest in a property with my account at Provident Trust Group?
Yes, you may, but only with a non-recourse loan. Typically, you must put down 30 percent or more to obtain the loan and not all banks or lenders provide non-recourse loans.
What do I do if I determine that I need to pay UBIT or UDFI?
UBIT and UDFI need to be paid from your account’s cash balance at Provident Trust Group and we, as a passive custodian, need your authorization to make that payment. If you determine that UBIT or UDFI is owed, please send us an Authorization to Take Action Form with the ‘Pay 990-T’ box marked in Section 3.  With the Authorization to Take Action Form, you will also need to complete the Form 990-T. We will then execute the Form 990-T and remit it to the IRS along with your UBIT or UDFI payment.
Where can I find more information on calculating UBIT or UDFI?

More information can be found on IRS.gov, particularly their page on Unrelated Business Income Tax.  Additionally, many tax advisors and CPAs will be able to assist in the determination and calculation of UBIT and UDFI owed on your retirement account’s investments.

What is the process to send additional funds to an LLC that is already owned by my account with Provident Trust Group?
Because the LLC is owned by the qualified account, funds need to first come to your account at Provident Trust Group (by contribution, rollover or transfer). The funds can then be sent to the LLC using a Direction of Investment Form. This allows Provident Trust Group to record the contribution, rollover or transfer into your qualified account and the purchase of additional shares of the LLC.
What is a non-recourse loan?
Non-recourse loans are the only types of loans that are permitted to be utilized within a qualified account. Traditional mortgages use personal assets and accreditation as security for the loan.  Since personal assets cannot stand as security for loan within a qualified account, the only recourse the bank has is to go after the property itself. Therefore, they typically will require a higher percentage of the cost of the property to be used as the down payment. Please consult your tax adviser about any Unrelated Debt Financed Income Tax (UDFI) that could arise due to obtaining a non-recourse loan.
Can my account invest with other partners, including myself?
Yes, your IRA can invest with other partners and yourself individually. However, it is important to consult legal counsel in these situations to observe formalities and rules that may be associated with that investment.
Can Provident Trust Group provide tax or legal advice regarding your investment?
No. If you should need tax or legal advice regarding your investment, you may engage a specialized tax law firm to provide the needed advice. Attorney-client privilege would then exist between you and the firm of your choice.
How should an investment made in my account at Provident Trust Group be titled?
Investments made from accounts at Provident Trust Group must be titled ‘Provident Trust Group, LLC FBO YOUR NAME ACCOUNT TYPE’ (example:  Provident Trust Group, LLC, FBO John Smith Roth IRA).
Why is Provident Trust Group listed as the owner of my asset?
As custodian, Provident Trust Group owns the assets in each account for the benefit of (FBO) your individual account.  This means that Provident Trust Group executes all investment documents and all documents related to the sale of the asset. This titling also ensures that the IRS recognizes that you are not personally benefiting from the assets held in your account before retirement. This allows you to recognize any potential tax benefits for which you might be eligible.
What is the maximum loan that can be taken from a Solo 401(k) account?

A loan can be taken from a 401(k) account for no more than $50,000 or 50% the value of the account (whichever is less).  Please see Retirement Plans FAQs Regarding Loans at IRS.gov for more information.

Real Estate Questions

Can my IRA purchase a property that I currently own?

No. The IRS regulations do not allow certain prohibited transactions that are considered “self-dealing,” and they don’t allow your self-directed IRA to buy property from or sell property to any disqualified person, including yourself.

Can my IRA purchase property that my corporation, partnership or LLC owns?

No. The IRS regulations do not allow certain prohibited transactions that are considered “self-dealing,” and they don’t allow your self-directed IRA to buy property from or sell property to any disqualified person, including yourself.

Can I purchase a vacation home that I use occasionally?

No. The purpose of the IRA is to provide for your retirement at some future date. It’s not intended to benefit you (or any other disqualified person) today. If your IRA engages in a prohibited transaction that, in some way, benefits you or a disqualified person, this is considered an “indirect benefit.”

Can I purchase a commercial property with my self-directed IRA and then rent office space in that building?

No. The purpose of the IRA is to provide for your retirement at some future date. It’s not intended to benefit you (or any other disqualified person) today. If your IRA engages in a prohibited transaction that, in some way, benefits you or a disqualified person, this is considered an “indirect benefit.”

Does the rental income have to go back into my IRA?

Yes. All income generated by an IRA-owned property must return to your IRA. This ensures that you retain the tax-deferred or tax-free status of the investment. However, you can request the funds in your IRA to be sent to you as a distribution.

Can my IRA invest in a newly formed entity (e.g., limited partnership, limited liability company, C corporation, land trust) that will invest in real estate?

Yes. Investments in newly-formed private entities are not prohibited under the Internal Revenue Code, with the exception of subchapter S corporations.

May funds from my IRA be used to renovate property in order to sell it at a higher price?

Yes. However, your IRA must pay all expenses associated with a property that it owns, including renovations. In addition, you as the IRA owner cannot participate in the renovations.  Further, all proceeds from the sale of the renovated property must be deposited into your IRA.

Why does my current IRA brokerage firm say I can’t buy real estate in my IRA, yet Provident Trust Group says I can?

Custodians determine the type of assets they will hold and may not choose to hold all assets the IRS allows. Life insurance contracts and collectibles are the only investment types prohibited by the Internal Revenue Code as an IRA investment. The IRS states on their website: “…because of administrative burdens, many IRA trustees do not allow IRA owners to invest IRA funds in real estate. IRA law does not prohibit investing in real estate but trustees are not required to offer real estate as an option”. So, just because your broker doesn’t offer real estate as an investment doesn’t mean that you can’t do it; it just means that you can’t do it through them.

Are there restrictions on the type of property that my IRA can purchase?

No. As long as it is an investment, your IRA can purchase any type of real estate (raw land, pre-development, commercial, residential, etc.

Will Provident Trust Group hold real property?

Yes. Provident Trust Group will hold direct title to real property, in addition to interests in Limited Liability Companies (LLC) or Limited Partnerships (LP) that hold title to real property; notes secured by trust deeds/mortgages; and interests in Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs).

How is the deposit on the property paid when the IRA is purchasing the property?

When your IRA purchases property the deposit or earnest funds are paid by the IRA. You cannot use personal funds for the deposit.

What is a non-recourse loan?

A non-recourse loan is a loan which you, as the IRA Owner, are not personally liable for repayment. The security instruments allow no recourse against you or the balance of your IRA. In the event of default/foreclosure, the lender can only look to the property as the source of repayment.

Will the income generated by the real property in my IRA be subject to taxation?

Although your IRA is tax-exempt, the manner in which the IRA generates tax-exempt income is limited by the Unrelated Business Taxable Income (UBTI) rules. If the IRA conducts an active trade or business, the income derived from that activity is taxed as UBTI. Some rents or debt-financed property may be subject to UBTI. If there is UBTI, IRS Form 990-T must be filed and the taxes must be paid from the IRA. We recommend that you consult with your tax advisor to determine if there is any UBTI.

If the IRA invests in vacation property can my family stay there on vacation?

No. You or any disqualified persons cannot personally benefit from the assets in your IRA.

IRA LLC Questions

What happens with income and expenses?

Because the LLC is the owner of the investment, all income and expenses can go through the business checking account.

Can I take distributions directly from the LLC’s business bank account?

No. That would be considered a prohibited transaction

What can I purchase inside my IRA-LLC?

Any investment that is not considered prohibited by the IRS.

Precious Metals Questions

Can I contribute Precious Metals I already own to my qualified account?

No. You can only contribute cash to your qualified account with annual contributions or through rollovers or transfers from other qualified accounts.

Can my qualified account purchase Precious Metals that I own personally?

No. This would result in a prohibited transaction.

Does Provident Trust Group dictate the depository I use?

No, you can select any depository, but there are depositories that Provident Trust Group currently holds metals with.

Does Provident Trust Group have metals brokers that they work with?

Provident Trust Group will work with any metals brokers that the client selects. 

What is the difference between segregated storage or in non-segregated (commingled) storage for Precious Metals?

Segregated storage is when you choose to store your Precious Metals is a separate vault at the depository storing your metals. There are typically higher fees associated with this. Non-segregated (commingled) storage is when you choose to store your metals in a vault that also holds metals for other customers. Commingled vaults have sub-accounting in place for each customer to ensure appropriate accounting.

Trust Account Questions

General Trust Account Questions

What is a Trust?
A trust is a legal entity that holds assets, such as cash or property, that is intended to provide benefit to an individual, group or organization. A trust generally involves a grantor, beneficiary, and trustee.
What is a Trust Agreement?
A trust agreement is a document that spells out the rules the trustee wants followed for assets held in trust for the trust’s beneficiaries.
What are common objectives for trusts?
To reduce the estate tax liability, to protect assets in your estate and to avoid probate.
What is probate?
It is a legal process that takes place after someone dies. It includes:

  • Proving in court that a deceased person’s will is valid;
  • Identifying and accounting for the deceased person’s assets;
  • Appraising any of the deceased person’s property;
  • Paying outstanding debts; and
  • Distributing the remaining assets per the instructions of the will. If there is no will, distributing the assets per state law of the deceased person’s residency.
What is a trustee?
The person in charge of the trust who makes sure everything in the trust stays in working order per the trust instructions.
What is a directed trustee?
It is a trustee that is directed by several other trust participants in implementing the trust’s execution.
What is a trust protector?
It is a person appointed under the trust instrument that can direct or restrain the trustees and make sure the best interests of the trust are followed. Usually it is a third-party that acts as a spokesperson between the beneficiaries and the trustees.
What is a beneficiary?
It is the person or institution that stands to receive some or all the assets that were placed into the trust. If an original owner of an account dies, the person or entity designated as the “beneficiary” is the entitled party to receive the assets with in the deceased person’s account.
What is the name of the person that sets up the trust?
The person is commonly known as either the trustor, settlor or grantor.
What is a revocable trust?
It is when you place assets in the trust and at some point, in the future, undo the transfer by removing the assets and terminating the trust.
What is an irrevocable trust?
It is when you place assets into the trust, however, you can’t retrieve the assets. For all intents and purposes, the assets now belong to the trust and not to you personally.
What is an asset-protection trust?
A trust that holds funds on a discretionary basis. This type of trust is set up in an attempt to avoid or mitigate taxes, divorce and bankruptcy on the beneficiaries.
Who should consider establishing an asset protection trust?
Typically established by individuals in high risk occupations (i.e., attorneys, doctors, dentists, etc.) and very wealthy individuals that realize they are targets for creditors due to their net worth. Asset protection trusts can also be used in lieu of prenuptial agreement.
Are there any tax reasons to establish an asset protection trust?
In certain situations, an asset protection trust can be used to eliminate or reduce the imposition of state income taxes. An asset protection trust may also be used to remove assets from a grantor’s estate while still allowing the grantor to potentially benefit from the trust assets.
What would I need to do to open up a trust account at Provident Trust Group?
We require that you send us a copy of your trust documents and a summary of the scope of duties for review. The review process can take up to 7 – 10 business days.
Can Provident Trust Group provide tax or legal advice?
No. If you should need tax or legal advice regarding your trust, we advise you speak with your tax professional or attorney. Mostly likely it is the attorney or estate planning attorney that drafted your trust instrument.
Can I see my account online?

Yes, upon account establishment, you will be able to register on our online portal and get access to your account at www.portal.trustprovident.com

Does Provident Trust Group send out statements?
Yes, Provident Trust Group sends out annual statements in January each year. However, if you should need a statement any other time, please contact Provident Trust Group.

Fee Questions

Where can I obtain at a trust fee schedule?
Since each trust is unique, we have a fee schedule that is catered specifically to your trust’s needs. A generic trust fee schedule can be provided upon request.
When are fees due?
Your one-time set up fee and trustee fee are due at the time of account establishment. The trustee fee is due annually thereafter on the anniversary of the establishment of your account. Transactional fees are due at the time of the transaction.

Do you Have Questions? Let us know!

Existing Clients
(888) 855-9856

Future Clients
(888) 662-0869

WHO WE ARE

With more than 34,000 clients in all 50 states, our elite team of professionals is the premier choice. We offer highly personalized service tailored to your needs, transforming your financial future.

CONTACT US

OUR ADDRESS

8880 W. Sunset Rd.,
Suite 250
Las Vegas, NV 89148

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FAX

(702) 253-7565

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HOURS OF OPERATION

Monday - Friday
6AM - 4PM (PST)
 

EMAIL

info@trustprovident.com

Provident Trust Group, LLC is a BBB Accredited Management Consultant in Las Vegas, NV